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Transfer RX

Transfer RX

Transferring your prescriptions is easy!

1. Contact Chancy Drugs

Fill out the form on the bottom of this page, call us, or stop by and let us know you want to transfer your prescriptions from your old pharmacy. Make sure you know the name, strength, and prescription number of each prescription you want to transfer to Chancy Drugs.

2. Have your personal and insurance information ready

Before we contact your old pharmacy to transfer your prescriptions, we will need the following information from you. 

  • Your first and last name
  • Date of birth
  • Address
  • Phone number
  • Any allergies you may have
  • Insurance card information

3. Hang tight

The amount of time it takes us to transfer your prescriptions can depend on how many prescriptions need to move over. Typically we can have your prescriptions filled and ready for pick up within one to three days.

Special Circumstances

If you’re on top of your medication regimen and know which of your prescriptions are eligible for a refill, transferring your prescriptions should be an easy task. However, it’s important to be aware that a few things could keep you from a smooth transfer process. Keeping in contact with your doctor’s office can help to make sure you don’t run into any of these hiccups.

  • Your prescription is out of refills.If your prescription is out of refills Chancy Drugs can contact your doctor on your behalf to request a new prescription. You may also want to reach out to your doctor’s office to ensure you aren't out of refills for reasons that your pharmacist won’t be able to resolve. For example, your doctor might need you to schedule a follow-up appointment or get blood work, or maybe, you no longer need a certain medication.
  • Some prescriptions can only be transferred once. Schedule III, IV, and V medications are controlled substances and can only be transferred one time, no matter how many refills you have left. After transferring them once, you’ll need a new prescription from your doctor to switch pharmacies again. Some common examples of these types of medications include Ambien (zolpidem), Tylenol with codeine (acetaminophen/codeine), testosterone, Ultram (tramadol) and Xanax (alprazolam).
  • Some prescriptions can’t be transferred. Schedule II controlled substance medications cannot be transferred—at all. They also aren’t eligible for refills; your doctor will need to give you a new prescription every time you fill. Some common examples include Adderall (amphetamine salt combo), Concerta (methylphenidate ER), Vicodin (hydrocodone/acetaminophen), Percocet (oxycodone/acetaminophen) and Oxycontin (oxycodone ER).

Get started by Transferring to Chancy Drugs